Difference between revisions of "Manual: Tmix: Internet Traffic Generation"

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==Tmix_DelayBox==
 
==Tmix_DelayBox==
Tmix uses ns-2 to model the TCP-level interaction between two nodes on the simulated link. To simulate network-level effects of TCP transfer through the clouds, use Tmix_DelayBox. Tmix_DelayBox is derived from DelayBox (Chapter 22). Tmix_DelayBox simply adds the ability to specify delays and losses for each connection using a connection vector file instead of making setting up rules for each source-destination pair. After a connection vector file is specified, Tmix_DelayBox parses each connection vector to obtain the loss rate and delay, which are written into the DelayBox flow table. Note that the current version of Tmix_DelayBox does not allow bandwidth limitations as does DelayBox, but that future versionsmay support this.
+
Tmix uses ns-2 to model the TCP-level interaction between two nodes on the simulated link. To simulate network-level effects of TCP transfer through the clouds, use Tmix_DelayBox. Tmix_DelayBox is derived from [[Manual: DelayBox: Per-Flow Delay and Loss|DelayBox]]. Tmix_DelayBox simply adds the ability to specify delays and losses for each connection using a connection vector file instead of making setting up rules for each source-destination pair. After a connection vector file is specified, Tmix_DelayBox parses each connection vector to obtain the loss rate and delay, which are written into the DelayBox flow table. Note that the current version of Tmix_DelayBox does not allow bandwidth limitations as does DelayBox, but that future versions may support this.
  
 
==Example==
 
==Example==
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==Commands at a Glance==
 
==Commands at a Glance==
 
The following commands on the Tmix class can be accessed from OTcl:
 
The following commands on the Tmix class can be accessed from OTcl:
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[new Tmix]
 
[new Tmix]
 
:Creates a new Tmix instance.
 
:Creates a new Tmix instance.
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$tmix set-run <int>
 
$tmix set-run <int>
:Set the run number so that the RNGs used for the random variables will use the same substream (see Chapter 25 on RNG for more details).
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:Set the run number so that the RNGs used for the random variables will use the same substream (see the section on [[Manual: Mathematical Support#Random Number Generation|random number generation]] in the chapter on [[Manual: Mathematical Support|mathematical support]] for more details).
  
 
$tmix set-debug <int>
 
$tmix set-debug <int>

Latest revision as of 05:20, 22 December 2008

Previous Chapter "PackMime-HTTP: Web Traffic Generation" | Index | Next Chapter "Session-level Packet Distribution"

In order to perform realistic network simulations, one needs a traffic generator that is capable of generating realistic synthetic traffic that “looks like” traffic found on an actual network. Tmix takes as input a packet header trace taken from a network link of interest. The trace is “reverse compiled” into a source-level characterization, called a connection vector, of each TCP connection present in the trace. This set of connection vectors is what drives the Tmix traffic generation in ns-2.

Connection vectors are represented through a pattern of application data units (ADUs) which are based on the a-b-t model [?]. Modeling TCP connections as a pattern of ADU transmissions provides a unified view of connections that does not depend on the specific applications driving each TCP connection. The first step in the modeling process is to acquire a trace of TCP/IP headers and process the trace to produce a set of connection vectors; one vector for each TCP connection in the trace.

The Tmix module in ns-2 takes a set of connection vectors and emulates the socket-level behavior of the source application that created the corresponding connection in the trace. This emulation faithfully reproduces the essential pattern of socket reads and writes that the original application performed without knowledge of what the original application actually was. When combined with Tmix_DelayBox (Section 43.4), the resulting traffic generated in the simulation is statistically representative of the traffic measured on the real link. All a user needs to replay traffic from a certain link is the file of a-b-t style connection vectors obtained from a trace of that link and this Tmix generator. This approach to synthetic traffic generation allows one to automatically reproduce in ns-2 the full range of TCP connections found on an arbitrary link.

The remainder of this chapter describes the implementation and use of Tmix in ns-2. For more details on the a-b-t model and validation of the Tmix generator, see [?].

Citation Request: If you use Tmix traffic generation in your work, please cite [?] (M.C. Weigle, P. Adurthi, F. Hernandez-Campos, K. Jeffay, and F.D. Smith, “Tmix: A Tool for Generating Realistic ApplicationWorkloads in ns-2”, ACMSIGCOMM Computer Communication Review, July 2006, Vol 36, No 3, pp. 67-76.).

Network Setup

The implementation of Tmix in ns-2 is based on PackMime-HTTP (Chapter 42), so it has a similar structure. A typical Tmix instance consists of four ns nodes: two initiator nodes and two acceptor nodes (Figure 43.1). It is important to note that these nodes do not correspond to a single initiator or acceptor. A single Tmix initiator node generates TCP connections coming from a “cloud” of connection initiators. Likewise, a single Tmix acceptor node accepts and serves TCP connections destined for a “cloud” of connection acceptors.

In order to simulate different RTTs, bottleneck links, and/or loss rates for each connection, Tmix should be used in conjunction with Tmix_DelayBox (see Section 43.4), derived from DelayBox (Chapter 22).

We use the terms inbound and outbound to represent the directions of data flow. As in Figure 43.1, traffic initiated outside of the circle (which could be thought of as a campus) is designated as inbound, and traffic initiated inside the circle is designated as outbound.

Connection Vectors

A connection vector is a representation of an observed TCP connection. Each connection vector has several fields which specify the type of connection (sequential or concurrent), connection start time, loss rate, window size, etc. Each connection vector also contains an arbitrary number of application data units (ADUs). Each ADU represents data to be sent over the network by either the initiator or the acceptor of the TCP connection. ADUs also specify when data should be sent relative to either the reception of an ADU or the completed sending of a previous ADU. A file containing an arbitrary number of connection vectors must be supplied to Tmix in order for any traffic to be generated.

Connection vectors are either sequential or concurrent. Sequential connection vectors are the most common and represent a request-reply type connection, where a new ADU is sent only after the previous ADU has been received. Concurrent connection vectors allow for deviation from the sequential pattern. For a concurrent connection, new ADUs are sent a certain amount of time after the previous ADU was sent and do not depend upon when ADUs were received. Examples of this type of application protocol include HTTP/1.1 (pipelining) and the BitTorrent file-sharing protocol.

Tmix in ns-2 can handle two different connection vector formats, which we term as original and alternate. We have provided a Perl script (ns/tmix/cvec-orig2alt.pl) to convert from the original format to the alternate format. The Tmix module in ns-2 can automatically detect the format of the given connection vector file.

Original Connection Vector Format

Examples of the original format of connection vectors as described in [?] are shown in Figure 43.2. Sequential and concurrent connection vectors are differentiated by the starting string in the first line: SEQ for a sequential connection and CONC for a concurrent connection. The second field in the first line gives the starting time for the connection in microseconds from time 0 (the start of the simulation). For sequential connections, the third field indicates the number of ADU exchanges, or epochs, present in the connection. For concurrent connections, the third field indicates the number of ADUs that the initiator sends, and the fourth field indicates the number of ADUs that the acceptor sends. The final two fields in the first line are identification numbers, of which only the final ID is used in ns-2.

SEQ 6851 1 21217 555382       # starts at 6.851 ms and contains 1 exchange (epoch)
w 64800 6432                  # win sz (bytes): init acc
r 1176194                     # min RTT (microseconds)
l 0.000000 0.000000           # loss: init->acc acc->init
> 245                         # init sends 245 bytes
t 51257                       # acc waits 51 ms after recv
< 510                         # acc sends 510 bytes
t 6304943                     # init waits 6.3 sec after send and then sends FIN

CONC 1429381 2 2 26876 793318 # starts at 1.4 s, init sends 2 ADUs and acc sends 2 ADUs
w 65535 5840                  # win sz (bytes)
r 36556                       # min RTT (microseconds)
l 0.000000 0.000000           # loss rate
c> 222                        # init sends 222 bytes
t> 62436302                   # init waits 62 sec
c< 726                        # acc sends 726 bytes
t< 62400173                   # acc waits 62 sec
c> 16                         # init sends 16 bytes
t> 725                        # init waits 725 us and then sends FIN
c< 84                         # acc sends 84 bytes
t< 130                        # acc waits 130 us and then sends FIN

Figure 43.2: Original Connection Vector Format Example. In the comments, we abbreviate the initiator as init and the acceptor as acc.


The second line in each, starting with w, gives the window sizes of the initiator and acceptor, respectively, in bytes. The third line, starting with r, gives the minimum RTT in microseconds between the initiator and acceptor. The fourth line, starting with l, provides the loss rates involved in each direction of the connection. The remaining lines in the connection vector show the ADU exchanges.

In a sequential connection vector, the ADUs are shown in increasing order by the times at which they are sent. The lines starting with > show the sizes of the ADUs sent by the initiator to the acceptor, and the lines starting with < show the sizes of the ADUs sent by the acceptor to the initiator. Note that there is a time dependency in case of sequential connection vectors. One side of the connection is dependent on the other side of the connection sending it an ADU.

In case of sequential connections, the line containing t can appear in any of the following four scenarios:

  1. After a line beginning with > and before a line beginning with <.
  2. After a line beginning with < and before a line beginning with >.
  3. At the end of the connection vector, after a line beginning with >.
  4. At the end of the connection vector, after a line beginning with <.

Depending on its placement, the semantics associated with the t value change. In case 1, t denotes the amount of time the acceptor has to wait after receiving an ADU from initiator before it can send its next ADU. In case 2, the t denotes the amount of time the initiator has to wait after receiving an ADU from acceptor before it can send its next ADU. In case 3, the t denotes the time the initiator has to wait after sending its last ADU and before closing the connection. In case 4, the t denotes the time that the acceptor has to wait after sending its last ADU and before closing the connection.

For a concurrent connection vector, lines starting with c> indicate the bytes sent by the initiator, and lines starting with c< indicate the bytes sent by the acceptor. Lines starting with t> indicate the time the initiator waits before sending the next ADU (or sending the FIN, if the last ADU has been sent). Likewise with lines beginning with t< and the acceptor. Note that there is no time dependence between the initiator and acceptor in case of a concurrent connection vector. The waiting times are between consecutive sends and are not dependent upon receiving an ADU from the other side.

Alternate Connection Vector Format

To disambiguate the multiple possible interpretations of the t value with sequential connections, we have modified the connection vector format into an alternate format. The basic idea is that in the case of sequential connection vectors, there really exist two times associated with the initiator or acceptor while sending an ADU to the other side:

  1. The amount of time the initiator/acceptor has to wait before sending the next ADU after sending its previous ADU (send_wait_time).
  2. The amount of time the initiator/acceptor has to wait before sending the next ADU after receiving an ADU from the other side (recv_wait_time).

Note that only one of the above two values is used by an initiator/acceptor while sending its ADU to the other side, i.e., the initiator/acceptor schedules sending its next ADU with respect to the event of receiving a ADU from the other side or with respect to the event of sending a previous ADU. The initiator/acceptor does not use both of these values at the same time, so in the new format one of these values is always set to 0. Also note that at the beginning of the connection, the side sending the first ADU will have both send_wait_time and recv_wait_time set to 0. In case of the t values appearing at the end of a connection vector in the original format, we introduce a dummy ADU with size 0 to represent the FIN that will be sent by the initiator/acceptor that sends the last ADU.

This same alternate representation can be used for concurrent connection vectors also. But because there is no time dependence between the sides of the connection, each side schedules sending its next ADU with respect to time at which it sent its last ADU. Therefore, in case of concurrent connection vectors, recv_wait_time is not applicable and is always set to 0. Also, in case of concurrent connection vectors, both the sides start sending their messages at the same time.

We keep the header lines of the connection vectors (those containing the start time, window size, RTT, and loss rates) in the same format as the original, except that we replace SEQ with S and CONC with C. Lines beginning with I denote actions for the initiator, and lines beginning with A show actions for the acceptor. The remaining format of these lines is send_wait_time recv_wait_time bytes. Figure 43.3 shows the alternate connection vector format corresponding to the sequential and concurrent connections shown in Figure 43.2.

S 6851 1 21217 555382      # starts at 6.851 ms and contains 1 exchange (epoch)
w 64800 6432               # win sz (bytes)
r 1176194                  # min RTT
l 0.000000 0.000000        # loss rate
I 0 0 245                  # init sends 245 bytes
A 0 51257 510              # acc waits 51.257 ms after recv then sends 510 bytes
A 6304943 0 0              # acc waits 6.3 sec after send then sends FIN
C 1429381 2 2 26876 793318 # starts at 1.4 s, init sends 2 ADUs and acc sends 2 ADUs
w 65535 5840               # win sz (bytes)
r 36556                    # min RTT
l 0.000000 0.000000        # loss rate
I 0 0 222                  # init sends 222 bytes
A 0 0 726                  # acc sends 726 bytes
I 62436302 0 16            # init waits 62 sec and then sends 16 bytes
A 62400173 0 84            # acc waits 62 sec and then sends 84 bytes
I 725 0 0                  # init waits 725 us and then sends FIN
A 130 0 0                  # acc waits 130 us and then sends FIN

Figure 43.3: Alternate Connection Vector Example. In the comments, we abbreviate the initiator as init and the acceptor as acc.

Implementation Details

Tmix is an ns object that drives the generation of TCP traffic. Each Tmix object controls the operation of two applications: a Tmix Application used to simulate a TCP connection acceptor and a Tmix Application used to simulate a TCP connection initiator. Each of these applications is connected to a TCP Agent (Full-TCP). Note: Tmix currently only supports Full-TCP agents, but one-way TCP support is under development.

Each initiator or acceptor cloud is represented by a single ns node that can produce and consume multiple TCP connections at a time (Figure 43.1). For each TCP connection, Tmix creates (or allocates from the inactive pool, as described below) initiator and acceptor applications and their associated TCP Agents. After setting up and starting each connection, Tmix sets a timer to expire when the next new connection should begin. The times at which connections begin are governed by the connection vectors supplied by the user. Connection vectors may be specified by the user by setting a connection vector file for Tmix to read from. New connections are started according to the connection arrival times found in the connection vector file, without regard to the completion of previous connections.

Tmix handles the re-use of applications and Agents that have completed their data transfer. There are 5 pools used to maintain applications and Agents – one pool for inactive TCP Agents and one pool each for active and inactive Tmix Application. The pools for active applications ensure that all active applications are destroyed when the simulation is finished. Active TCP Agents do not need to be placed in a pool because each active application contains a pointer to its associated TCP Agent. New objects are only created when there are no Agents or applications available in the inactive pools.

Tmix Application

There is only one Tmix Application class. This class is responsible for handling both the initiator and acceptor roles, although different instances of this class are used for each role, i.e., one object does not handle both the initiator and acceptor roles at the same time.

The behavior of the Tmix Application class is in large part controlled by the connection vectors found in the connection vector file set by the user. Each connection vector specifies the data to be sent by the initiator and acceptor applications and under what conditions that data should be sent.

Sequential Connections

The first ADU that has a 0 value for both recv_wait_time and send_wait_time is sent as soon as the connection is initiated. All following sends only occur after the initiator or acceptor application has received the expected amount of data from its peer (i.e., the initiator or acceptor application to which it is connected) and after some delay specified by the next ADU to be sent. The expected amount of data to be received from the peer is determined by looking at the size of the current ADU that should be being sent by the peer application.

Concurrent Connections

Both sides begin sending their data after the delay specified by their ADUs. Later sends are scheduled to occur after the current send has finished and after some delay specified by the next ADU to be sent.

Acceptor-Sending-First Connections

There are some connectionswhere the acceptor sends the first ADU. In reality, the initiator always sets up the TCP connection, but in ns-2 the connection is not setup until the first data bytes are sent. In these cases, the acceptor will send the SYN to setup the connection and then will send its ADU.

Tmix_DelayBox

Tmix uses ns-2 to model the TCP-level interaction between two nodes on the simulated link. To simulate network-level effects of TCP transfer through the clouds, use Tmix_DelayBox. Tmix_DelayBox is derived from DelayBox. Tmix_DelayBox simply adds the ability to specify delays and losses for each connection using a connection vector file instead of making setting up rules for each source-destination pair. After a connection vector file is specified, Tmix_DelayBox parses each connection vector to obtain the loss rate and delay, which are written into the DelayBox flow table. Note that the current version of Tmix_DelayBox does not allow bandwidth limitations as does DelayBox, but that future versions may support this.

Example

The following is an example of using Tmix and Tmix_DelayBox. Another example can be found at tcl/ex/tmix/test-tmix.tcl. The validation script test-suite-tmix.tcl is in tcl/test/ and can be run with the command test-all-tmix from that directory.

# Simulation script to simulate the tmix-ns component
#::::::::::: Useful Variables ::::::::::::::::::::::
set end 3600;                 # length of traced simulation (s)
set INBOUND "inbound.cvec"
set OUTBOUND "outbound.cvec"
#::::::::::: Setup Simulator ::::::::::::::::::::::
remove-all-packet-headers;    # removes all packet headers
add-packet-header IP TCP;     # adds TCP/IP headers
set ns [new Simulator];       # instantiate the Simulator
$ns use-scheduler Heap
#::::::::::: Setup Topology ::::::::::::::::::::::
# create nodes
set n(0) [$ns node]
set n(1) [$ns node]
set n(2) [$ns node]
set n(3) [$ns node]
379
# create Tmix_DelayBox nodes
set tmixNet(0) [$ns Tmix_DelayBox]
$tmixNet(0) set-cvfile "$INBOUND" [$n(0) id] [$n(1) id]
$tmixNet(0) set-lossless
set tmixNet(1) [$ns Tmix_DelayBox]
$tmixNet(1) set-cvfile "$OUTBOUND" [$n(3) id] [$n(2) id]
$tmixNet(1) set-lossless
# create links
$ns duplex-link $n(0) $tmixNet(0) 1000Mb 0.1ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $n(2) $tmixNet(0) 1000Mb 0.1ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $tmixNet(0) $tmixNet(1) 1000Mb 0.1ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $tmixNet(1) $n(1) 1000Mb 0.1ms DropTail
$ns duplex-link $tmixNet(1) $n(3) 1000Mb 0.1ms DropTail
# set queue buffer sizes (in packets) (default is 20 packets)
$ns queue-limit $n(0) $tmixNet(0) 500
$ns queue-limit $tmixNet(0) $n(0) 500
$ns queue-limit $n(2) $tmixNet(0) 500
$ns queue-limit $tmixNet(0) $n(2) 500
$ns queue-limit $tmixNet(0) $tmixNet(1) 500
$ns queue-limit $tmixNet(1) $tmixNet(0) 500
$ns queue-limit $tmixNet(1) $n(1) 500
$ns queue-limit $n(1) $tmixNet(1) 500
$ns queue-limit $tmixNet(1) $n(3) 500
$ns queue-limit $n(3) $tmixNet(1) 500
#::::::::::: Setup TCP ::::::::::::::::::::::
Agent/TCP/FullTcp set segsize_ 1460;      # set MSS to 1460 bytes
Agent/TCP/FullTcp set nodelay_ true;      # disabling nagle
Agent/TCP/FullTcp set segsperack_ 2;      # delayed ACKs
Agent/TCP/FullTcp set interval_ 0.1;      # 100 ms
#::::::::::: Setup Tmix ::::::::::::::::::::::
set tmix(0) [new Tmix]
$tmix(0) set-init $n(0);                  # name $n(0) as initiator
$tmix(0) set-acc $n(1);                   # name $n(1) as acceptor
$tmix(0) set-ID 7
$tmix(0) set-cvfile "$INBOUND"
set tmix(1) [new Tmix]
$tmix(1) set-init $n(3);                  # name $n(3) as initiator
$tmix(1) set-acc $n(2);                   # name $n(2) as acceptor
$tmix(1) set-ID 8
$tmix(1) set-cvfile "$OUTBOUND"
#::::::::::: Setup Schedule ::::::::::::::::::::::
$ns at 0.0 "$tmix(0) start"
$ns at 0.0 "$tmix(1) start"
$ns at $end "$tmix(0) stop"
$ns at $end "$tmix(1) stop"
$ns at [expr $end + 1] "$ns halt"

$ns run

Commands at a Glance

The following commands on the Tmix class can be accessed from OTcl:

[new Tmix]

Creates a new Tmix instance.

$tmix start

Start Tmix

$tmix stop

Stop Tmix

$tmix set-init <node>

Set the initiator node on which the connection initiator applications will be run

$tmix set-acc <node>

Set the acceptor node on which the connection acceptor applications will be run

$tmix set-outfile <filename>

Outputs the results of the active-connections and total-connections commands to the specified file instead of standard error

$tmix set-cvfile <filename>

Set the connection vector file from which to start and run connections

$tmix set-ID <int>

Set the NS id for this object

$tmix set-run <int>

Set the run number so that the RNGs used for the random variables will use the same substream (see the section on random number generation in the chapter on mathematical support for more details).

$tmix set-debug <int>

Set the debugging level:

$tmix set-warmup <int>

Sets at what time output should start. Only used with set outfile.

$tmix set-TCP <protocol>

Sets the TCP type (Reno, Newreno, or Sack) for all connections in the client and server clouds - Reno is the default

$tmix set-pkt-size <int>

Size of packets to construct and send (TCP MSS)

$tmix set-step-size

Number of connection vector to read at a time from the supplied connection vector file

$tmix active-connections

Output the number of currently active connections to standard error or the outfile if it has been set.

$tmix total-connections

Output the total number of completed connections to standard error or the outfile if it has been set.

Tmix_DelayBox Commands

The following commands on the Tmix_DelayBox class can be accessed from OTcl (note that Tmix_DelayBox inherits commands available for DelayBox):

[$ns Tmix_DelayBox]

Creates a new Tmix_DelayBox node.

$tmix_db set-cvfile <filename>

Set the connection vector file from which to read the delays and loss rates for each flow

$tmix_db set-lossless

Do not induce any losses

$tmix_db set-debug <int>

Set the debugging level

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